How To Identify Frustration As Motivation Levels Fall

Managers make decisions that will not always please either the individual member of staff, or staff teams, and given that no one likes change there will always be some form of reaction. This is part of the job but a careful eye is needed to manage reactions and lowering of motivation levels.

Frustration is the negative response to the blocking of a goal or a change in working practices which results in a defensive form of behaviour. There are many different responses to any decision each of which is a personal reaction depending upon that particular individual.

Frustration falls under four basic types but it is highly likely that they will overlap and can be combined in many different ways.

  1. Aggression: physical or verbal attack on a person or object. Where that process cannot be directed at the specific cause for the frustration there will be displaced into aggression at someone or something else.
  2. Regression: reverting to a childish state of mind to show the frustration being felt. This can include sulking, crying, tantrums or striking out at a physical object.
  3. Fixation: repeating actions that have no positive outcomes. This can include the inability to accept change that has been imposed or the introduction of new ideas and processes.
  4. Withdrawal: apathy, giving up or resignation. This is likely to include late arrival at work, leaving early, higher levels than normal of absenteeism and sickness leave. Really disruptive withdrawal features refusing to accept responsibility, avoiding any decision-making and passing jobs to others without the authority to do so. The ultimate expression of withdrawal would be to leave the organisation.

Always be vigilant and look to challenge negative behaviour at both the individual and team level as soon as they appear.

Good Luck!

For more details about our services visit the website www.davidsummertonconsulting.co.uk