What Should A New Manager Focus Upon?

You got the job! Brilliant.

So, what to do, now that you are a manager and not just one of the team?

  1. Set clear goals. Just keep them simple and precise so that you are not just waiting for things to happen and idling around and you are definitely NOT being pulled in different directions by a whole host of different people. Think about what would success look like when you go for another promotion and use that to really shape what your objectives are! Once you decide what they are, stick to them and review them systematically.
  2. What are the distractions you need to avoid? There are lots of things that you could do in the role and with your team but what are the things to avoid, the things that are probably interesting but which are not going to be measured anywhere or anytime soon. Think of things as if you owned the organisation – what wouldn’t you tolerate from your managers in terms of outputs and decisions?
  3. Set and communicate your standards. People at all levels want to know what exactly is expected of them in their roles and how they should deal with tasks and responsibilities. Failure to do so will result in lots of effort going into tasks and routines that are poor in terms of quality, timeliness and customer satisfaction, leaving staff demotivated when you have to tell them, belatedly, that the outputs were not what you wanted.
  4. Expect problems and seek them out. Things rarely go smoothly, even for short periods of time, so it is far better to think ahead of the current situation and identify where problems will emerge. This may seem like a waste of time now, BUT, by thinking like that you can get ahead of issues and plan so that you limit the problems you will face in the future.
  5. Be a clear and effective communicator. Never talk in riddles – be concise and measured in what you say and write so that it becomes obvious what you mean. We all like plain directions that we can all understand – not wishy-washy words that are hard to put into action.
  6. Be honest about successes and failures. If you never sit back and analyse what is going on then you will never see problems for what they are and you get sucked into a universe where everything is “OK”. Hardly high-performance and not likely to get you rave reviews either!
  7. Sort out under-performance as soon as it appears. If your car was not running smoothly would you use it to drive 1,000 miles? Unlikely! If staff are not delivering what is needed, then plan to remedy that immediately and do not be tempted to let things stay as they are. Honest feedback that is balanced, fair and objective will always be welcomed by someone who probably already know that things are not working as they should.
  8. Be ready to deal with the thorny issue of dismissing staff. This is part of the job but it has to be done in the right way so this is a very important success factor for you, especially if you are committed to high-performance. Consistently poor performers will always drag down the performance of the team and they need to be dealt with appropriately.
  9. Be nice – show some compassion. Even in the worst times you should never, ever abandon being kind and treating people with respect and dignity.
  10. Give lots of feedback. This is good if that feedback is sincere and meaningful, is well-timed and is objective. Staff will always appreciate feedback like that and as this costs you nothing, is a great way to improve morale and motivation.

Use the above continually to refine your skills and maximise your impact.

Good Luck!

For more details about our services visit the website www.davidsummertonconsulting.co.uk

 

 

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