How To Design And Deliver An Outstanding Pitch

In its most basic format, a pitch should actually be a value proposition: a positioning statement that explains what benefit you provide for who and how you do it uniquely well. It describes your target buyer, the problem you solve, and why you are distinctly better than the alternatives

Define the problem set to help vet whether it’s a problem worth solving

A significant part of defining a value proposition involves addressing a number of key points, to which the answer should be a clear “yes” if the value proposition is to work.

  1. Is the problem Unworkable? Does your solution fix a broken business process where there are real, measurable consequences to inaction? If this puts someone in real difficulty that person will be pushing your case strongly and consistently.
  2. Is fixing the problem Unavoidable? Is it driven by a mandate that cannot be ignored or substituted for something else? If this surrounds a compliance issue, something that has to be completed or achieved, then there is only limited chance your proposition will be ignored.
  3. Is the problem Urgent? Is it one of the top few priorities for a company? If your idea does not fit into that category you have only a limited chance of success.
  4. Is the problem Underserved? Is there a clear lack of valid solutions to the problem you are looking to solve?  Focus on the gaps in the market or segment.

Always aim to be in the position of addressing problems that are blatant and critical, as they are far more acute than those that are latent and aspirational. Blatant and critical problems stand in the way of business. They put careers and reputations at risk. Latent problems are unacknowledged, which means they often require costly missionary selling. Aspirational problems are optional, which is the hardest of places for a sales approach.

Good Luck!

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