How To Write A Brilliant CV

There may be many online recruitment agencies and services but there is still a place for the use of a  crisp, appealing and informative CV to sell yourself effectively and efficiently.

Many recruiters will only spend around 10 seconds glancing over a CV at the initial assessment stage – the trick is to make sure that YOUR CV stands out from the crowd!

Try applying the 6 tips below in your next CV:

  1. Check and double-check the document: it is always frightening to see just how many CVs contain really basic spelling errors and grammatical flaws. Put simply the vast majority of recruiters and firms are instantly put off from considering a candidate by such basic errors. Do your skills meet the job requirements? A massive gap in your skills and abilities from those needed in the job leads to almost instant rejection!

Another big error is listing too many jobs over a short time period, having a CV that is more than two pages and a CV with a picture – that last point is just NOT what is needed.

  1. Stand out for the RIGHT reasons: have a CV that is crisp, short and to the point. Poor CVs have excessive detail and information on jargon, hobbies, out-dated employment history and photographs. Also use simple grammar and words and avoid at all costs big words – if in doubt only use simple, plain language!
  2. De-age the CV: there is no requirement to state your age so remove this if it is present. Also be very careful to make sure that your layout is an up to date version that begins with a personal statement rather than just a chronological list of virtually everything that you have ever done!
  3. Address any misconceptions around your IT skills (or lack of them!): be clear about your level of IT practical knowledge so that your potential employer understands where you are in this area. (If it is obvious that your IT skills may be possibly holding you back DO SOMETHING ABOUT IT and enrol at College on a part-time IT course to give you a better chance of success).
  4. Emphasise your experience and skills: highlight what you CAN DO and not what you HAVE DONE. If the vacancy you are interested in asks for a “Team Player” show this through your achievements, volunteering, working history or even through playing in a sports team.
  5. Draw attention to your career development: show how you have built upon your skills and how you have worked to widen out your training and skills. Following on from this always be clear in your covering letter to highlight the sort of training and development you would like to receive in the role on offer.

Good Luck!

For more details of our services visit the website www.davidsummertonconsulting.co.uk

 

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